Posts Tagged "instruction"

2 Considerations: Planning for Interventions

If you’ve concluded your Beginning of Year (BOY) assessments, then you’re probably planning RtI for struggling students. When selecting instructional materials for intervention support, these two questions are critical to your students’ success:

  1. Is the material aligned to the standards students are struggling with?
  1. Does the instructional material provide sufficient practice for students to master those skills?

Imagine that your assessments show that a 2nd grade student needs help decoding multiple syllabic words (a) in context and (b) independent of context by applying common letter sound correspondences.

ELAR TEKS 2A

The table below shows a popular intervention material’s alignment to the Elements of the Standard that addresses decoding words in context.  The material is aligned to each Element of the Standard; in fact, all 3 of the citations Learning List reviewed* were aligned to each Element.

Standard 2.A.1: Decoding words in context:

ELAR TEKS 2A

In contrast, the table below shows the material’s alignment to the Elements of the Standard that addresses decoding words independent of context.  One of the citations Learning List reviewed was aligned to each Element of the Standard, but five other citations reviewed were not aligned.

Standard 2.A.2: Decoding words independent of context:

ELAR TEKS 2A

While the instructional material is aligned to both of the standards the student is struggling with, this material would provide only one opportunity for the student to learn/practice each Element of the second standard, decoding multisyllabic words independent of context.

Some level of repetition is typically required for students to understand, internalize, and master content and skills. If this is an adaptive material, this material’s single “aligned” citation may not be instructionally sufficient to help the student “master” decoding multisyllabic words independent of context.

If this were your student, you would be advised to look for a different material that contains more citations aligned to each Element of these two standards, or use the reviewer’s comments in the alignment report to adjust instruction to match the full intent of the standard.

Learning List’s alignment reports make it easy to identify materials that are aligned to the standard your students are struggling with and help you determine whether the material provides sufficient practice for your students to master those standards.

*If the publisher’s correlation lists fewer than three citations as aligned to a standard, Learning List’s subject matter experts review all of the citations listed. If the publisher’s correlation cites more than three citations as being aligned to a standard, Learning List employs a “spot check” verification methodology – at least three and up to eight citations are reviewed for alignment to the standard. If teachers want to use a citation that Learning List has not reviewed, they would be advised to check the alignment of the citation themselves. However, Learning List’s alignment report serves as a guide as to how likely it is that any additional citation would be aligned to that standard.

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Administrators, Are You Using Learning List to Plan for Observations?

It’s mid-September and classroom observations are starting.Teacher at desk

Learning List resources can assist you in preparing for classroom observations and coaching conversations. Below are sample questions related to each T-TESS dimension that addresses “alignment” of lessons and  activities to the state standards and using materials to assess student progress. These questions may be useful in conversations prior to observations or edited and used during coaching conversations after observations.

Please note, the short descriptions of the dimensions below does not capture the full scope of the rubric’s expectations. Consult the rubric for further detail.

Planning Dimension 1.1: The teacher designs clear, well organized, sequential lessons that reflect best practice, align with standards and are appropriate for diverse learners.

Sample Coaching Questions

  • Which instructional material(s) supports the objectives for this lesson?
  • What criteria do you use to determine whether an instructional material is aligned to the standards being taught in the lesson?
  • How do you determine the sequence of instructional materials to use?
  • Will you use technology in the lesson? If so, how will you determine the most appropriate technology to use?
  • How are you using instructional materials to help you differentiate instruction?

Planning Dimension 1.2: The teacher uses formal and informal methods to measure student progress, then manages and analyzes student data to inform instruction.

Sample Coaching Questions

  • What type of instruments will you use to assess student progress?
  • How will you use the data you get back from those formative assessments to guide small group instruction?
  • How do you involve students in monitoring their progress?
  • What resources are available for instructing students of varying needs? What criteria do you use to determine which to use?
  • What type of feedback do you find most effective with the students you teach?

Planning Dimension 1.4: The teacher plans engaging, flexible lessons that engage higher-order thinking, persistence and achievement.

Sample Coaching Questions

  • What questions have you planned for the lesson?
  • Which questioning and/or other strategies will you use to encourage all students to engage in higher-order thinking?
  • How will you use your instructional materials to prompt students to engage in higher order thinking and questioning?
  • How will you assess the alignment of your activities with instructional materials?

Instruction Dimension 2.2: The teacher uses content and pedagogical expertise to design and execute lessons aligned with state standards, related content and student needs.

Sample Coaching Questions

  • Can you demonstrate that this lesson is aligned to the state standards you are intending to cover?
  • How does this lesson align to the district curriculum (scope and sequence)?
  • How will you use your instructional materials to provide students with opportunities to use different types of thinking and problem solving skills? What real world scenarios will you reference to support student learning?

We encourage principals to leverage the reviews and tools on Learning List to help implement the T-TESS rubric during the observation and coaching cycle.  Contact us if you would like to schedule training to help support this important work.

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Models Matter

Instructional ModelsWhen selecting materials, one important criterion educators should consider is the instructional model on which the material is based. Resources should mirror and support the model the district uses or else instruction may become disjointed.

Over the next few months, Learning List’s blog will discuss the instructional models most frequently implemented in the products we review. Our discussion will seek to highlight the key attributes of each model and clarify where a particular model may or may not be an appropriate structure for content.

Learning List has reviewed more than 1,000 instructional materials in the four core content areas and Technology Applications. In the process of our reviews, we have become familiar with products that incorporate a variety of instructional models. We’ve reviewed products that organize instruction using well-known models, such as 5E, Universal Design, and Understanding by Design (UbD), as well as lesser known models targeted to particular subject areas and specific learning needs.

Generally speaking, each model presents a recognizable structure that seeks to order content in a way that supports engagement and helps students make sense of what they are learning. Models compress the learning cycle into a predictable set of routines that may be effectively implemented in classroom schedules at the elementary, middle, and/or high school levels. Each model provides an underlying framework for instruction that provides consistency and coherence within and across grade levels, structuring learning experiences in ways that enable teachers to plan effective lessons and allow students to purposefully explore content.

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Time Requirements for Online Products

With more school districts using online instructional materials, finding enough time for students to work on computers is often a challenge for educators.  This is of particular importance when students need to be engaged with a product for a minimum amount of time each week in order to progress academically.

When selecting online instructional materials, educators should pay attention to the publisher’s statements about the amount of time students should work in a particular online program in order to show academic growth. Often, educators don’t know this information until they have already purchased the product. Then they find that there is not enough time in the class’ or computer lab’s schedule to allow each student to work on a computer for the required amount of time.

Learning List’s editorial reviews highlight the time requirements for online products to help educators select not only the instructional materials that meet their students’ needs, but equally important, the products that  the district or school has the technical infrastructure to support.

 

 

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It’s Everyone’s Business!

In order for students to progress academically each year and have the skills to be successful in the future, all educators at the campus and district level need to unite in their efforts to ensure that every student is learning the TEKS to the depth and complexity required.

When teachers develop units and lesson plans, do they keep the TEKS in the forefront of their mind as to what they want their students to accomplish?  Is the priority in professional learning communities (PLCs) focused on discussions regarding teaching and assessing the TEKS, as well as analyzing ongoing student achievement data?

While observing in the classroom, do campus and district administrators ask themselves what is the standard being taught, how well are the students’ tasks aligned to the TEKs, and how successful are the students working on this task?

Do campus support staff discuss with the teacher what is being taught in the classroom as well as gather information on the progress of the students before they provide additional support to students in need?    Does central office curriculum staff understand the TEKS well so they can successfully facilitate curriculum writing with the end result being a closely aligned curriculum to the TEKS?

Making sure that students are being taught the TEKS correctly is everyone’s business.  The old adage, “It takes a whole village to educate a child” refers in part to everyone taking responsibility to help students acquire a deep understanding of the TEKS so they can be successful and productive citizens in their communities.

 

 

 

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