Posts Tagged "Supplemental"

New Review: TeachMe’s Math Games

TeachMe Math GamesLearning List has reviewed TeachMe’s Math Games. This is a supplemental online product that supports math instruction for grades PK-8. Instruction uses an online suite of math games and apps to engage students using interactive, play-based learning experiences. Games address the Common Core State Standards Mathematics (CCSSM) content standards at each grade level. The CCSSM Mathematical Process Standards are not taught.

Math Games organizes content at each grade level by math skills (e.g., comparison, fractions) and CCSSM content standards. Instruction is presented in games that provide corrective feedback and progress through a set of related skills. Many games are text-based and require students to read instructions, word problems, and written answers, which may present challenges for emerging readers, struggling readers, and English language learners. A robotic audio reader is provided.

Learning List’s reviewers found Math Games to be a valuable resource in supporting RtI students, noting that teachers may create customized lessons to improve fluency and to address basic concepts (e.g., open or closed shapes) that build understanding of more rigorous content. Math Games are available at no cost at www.mathgames.com

About TeachMe*

TeachMe’s games and apps are guided by the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and pay careful attention to regional curriculum all over the world. Math Games uses a customized approach to learning and games change based on who is playing, their mastery of skills and their experiences.

Information in this section is provided by or adapted from Math Games.

Read More

New Review: Apex Learning’s Texas Geometry

LApex Learning's Texas Geometryearning List has reviewed Apex Learning’s Texas Geometry. This is a comprehensive, online geometry product for Texas students. Core content is presented online and includes some printable materials. The course focuses on developing students’ conceptual understanding, computational skills, and proficiency in solving problems. Resources support instruction in self-paced, remediation, and credit-recovery programs.

Texas Geometry is organized in two semesters. The first semester’s content is presented in five units that cover the foundations of geometry, triangles, right triangles, quadrilaterals and other polygons, and circles without coordinates. The second semester presents content in four units that address coordinate geometry, constructions and transformations, three-dimensional solids, and applications of probability. Across semesters, students learn to reason mathematically and to use mathematical models and tools to solve real-world problems.

Each unit begins with a short video introduction that frames the real-world applications of what students will learn and connects new content to prior learning. Subsequent instruction is provided through a set of online activities and, where appropriate, accompanying worksheets. Each unit and semester ends with two versions of a unit/semester exam—one version presents open-ended questions and the second is made up of multiple choice items.

About Apex Learning*

Apex Learning’s digital curriculum is designed to support all students in achieving their potential, from those struggling with grade-level content to those capable of accelerating their learning. The curriculum is designed to actively engage students in learning—combining embedded supports and scaffolds to meet diverse student needs, actionable data to inform instruction, and success management, to ensure students get the outcomes they need.

*Information in this section is provided by or adapted from Apex Learning.

Read More

New Review: BrainPop

BrainPopLearning List recently reviewed BrainPOP’s core content resources (i.e., science, social studies, mathematics, and English language arts) for grades K-8. BrainPOP is a supplemental program that supports instruction in the core content areas as well as technology, arts and music, and health. Resources are available online and include some printable materials (e.g., worksheets). Instruction uses engaging videos and interactive concept maps to address content.

BrainPOP organizes content in “Topics” that address a range of subject-area concepts (e.g., atoms, citizenship, writing skills). Topics include a short movie in which an animated characters named Annie (grades K-3) and Tim (grades 4-8) and their robot friend Moby explore a question (e.g., How do tornadoes form?). Movies provide background information, explore and illustrate key concepts (e.g., updrafts), and introduce and define new vocabulary.

After the movie, students can “Make a Map” and/or take a short quiz over content. Make a Map allows students to create a concept map using a set of premade map templates, such as compare and contrast, vocabulary, cyclical relationships, and problem/solution analysis. Tools also allow students to create entirely new concept maps. The quiz is a five-question multiple-choice check for understanding.

Other resources include content-related games, an “FYI” feature, and additional activities related to the video. FYI is a set of 5-paragraph, illustrated, informational articles and a related comic that extend students’ learning. For example, the FYI for a social studies topic addressing the California Gold Rush includes articles about traveling to California Trail and the Donner Party, John Sutter, and a comic addressing gold prices.

About BrainPOP*

BrainPOP was founded in 1999 by Avraham Kadar, M.D., an immunologist and pediatrician, as a creative way to explain difficult concepts to his young patients. Today, BrainPOP is used in 25 percent of U.S. elementary and middle schools, with rapid international growth. An in-house team of educators, animators, and writers produce and continually improve BrainPOP, incorporating valuable teacher and parent input.

*Information in this section is provided by or adapted from BrainPOP.

Read More

Are You In a New Role This Year?

Are you teaching a new grade level or subject this year? If so, have you had time to investigate the instructional materials provided by the district for the grade or course you are teaching? Sometimes when we have short notice of a change of assignment there just doesn’t seem to be enough time to plan. Elementary Classroom
Three years into my teaching career I moved between campuses and inherited a book cart full of materials for my new assignment. I had no idea which materials were current or most aligned to the standards for the course I would be teaching!  To make things more difficult, I was a singleton teacher and had no one to ask.  It took me a long time to wade through what I had and I am quite sure that I was missing components of the material that came with the original purchase.
If you are in a similar position consider the following as you navigate your new role and review the materials you have.

  1. What types of materials do you have?

Are your materials comprehensive or supplemental?

A comprehensive material is one that supports instruction for a course’s full curriculum and is provided for all students. Such materials would include broad, deep discussions of content; remediation and enrichment activities; formative and summative assessments; as well as teacher resources.

 Supplemental resources are not designed to be the sole instructional resource for a course. Instead, supplementary materials complement, enrich, or extend the content of comprehensive resources. It seems reasonable that supplemental products will vary in terms of their alignment to standards. Some products may focus on a narrow set of standards, while others, such as test preparation resources, may provide a brief review of all standards.

  1. What other instructional resources are included with those materials? For example, do you and/or your students have access to additional web resources, or consumables that may engage them or help extend their learning? Hopefully you were left a list, or someone else on your team can provide this information to you. If not, it may be worth your time to research the material on the publisher’s website in order to understand all of the components you have at your fingertips.
  1. Is the material aligned to the standards you are teaching? Sometimes we have older materials that were purchased prior to a standards revision cycle. Those may not address all the current standards students are responsible for learning. How would you know?
  • Compare the material’s publication date to the date the new standards were implemented.
  • If provided, use the publisher’s correlation to identify which standards are addressed in the instructional material.
  • When planning your instruction check that the citation(s) (page, lesson, video, etc.) you plan on using  is aligned to the content, context, and cognitive demand of the standards you are teaching. Students won’t learn what they are not taught.  So make sure the materials you are using address the entire standards you are teaching.

Thinking back to my third year teaching I would have been a far more effective teacher if I had known to check my materials.  I didn’t.  I hope this helps you avoid the same mistake so that your students have the best opportunity for success.

 

Read More

New Review: Compass Learning’s Pathblazer

[Source: Compass Learning]

[Source: Compass Learning]

Compass Learning’s Pathblazer is a supplemental online program that supports intervention and remediation in English language arts/reading (ELAR) and mathematics across grades K-8. Adaptive screening and diagnostic tools identify individual student’s learning gaps and prescribe a customized plan that addresses gaps and moves students toward on-grade level instruction. Learning List has reviewed Pathblazer’s ELAR resources for middle school students (i.e., grades 6-8).

Pathblazer uses an “Initial Screener” and a “Proficiency-Level Diagnostic” to identify each student’s learning needs. Based on combined assessment results, students are prescribed an individualized, standards-based instructional path that addresses gaps, accelerates learning, and moves students toward on-grade level instruction. Learning paths are made up of thematic, text-based lessons designed to build students’ vocabulary, fluency, reading comprehension, and writing skills.

Lessons are engaging and balance entertaining instruction with high-quality content. Direct instruction is provided through animated, interactive videos that clarify learning objectives, vocabulary, and literary terms and devices. Instruction focuses on building foundational skills and reading fluency and includes frequent quizzes that check for understanding.

About Compass Learning*

Compass Learning purpose-builds K–12 learning acceleration software for blended learning, intervention, high school, and inquiry-based personalized learning. Compass® software helps pinpoint and close skill and concept gaps and move students forward academically with:

  • Explicit instruction
  • Supported practice
  • Independent practice
  • Ongoing formative assessment

Compass Learning’s award-winning content is rigorous, yet fun, so students remain engaged and motivated to learn.

* The content in this section is provided by or adapted from Compass Learning

Subscribe to Learning List for access to the spec sheet, full editorial review and detailed alignment report for this material.

Read More

Subscribe!

Click here to subscribe for weekly updates.

Connect with us

Categories

Blog Calendar

January 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031