Increasingly, policy groups and thought leaders are pointing to the need for a resource, such as Learning List, that provides objective reviews of instructional materials.  They assert that the need for independent, objective reviews has increased (1) as new instructional materials are introduced to support Common Core implementation, and (2) as more states deregulate their instructional materials markets and allow districts and schools more choice in the online and print materials they use. In a report released in November, the Business Roundtable highlighted the need for an independent organization to review new instructional materials to assess their alignment to the CCSS. And last week, Thomas Arnett of the Clayton Christensen Institute commented in a blog:

[W]e need a system for providing both expert and user reviews of course choice options, similar to those available from Consumer Reports or on sites like CNet, Angie’s List, or RateMyProfessors.com. Standardized measures are nice because they are quantitative and objective, but they cannot capture all the aspects of quality that parents and students may want to know.

 Arnett’s post highlights Learning List as a service that is “stepping up” to provide educators and parents with the reviews and  information they need to choose the best instructional materials for their students.  We couldn’t agree more.